Posts Tagged ‘Russian Grand Prix’

InstaForex at 2014 Russian Grand Prix

Thursday, October 30th, 2014

On May 18, 1914, German racing driver Willy Scholl won the Russian Grand Prix in St. Petersburg. He became the second, and as many thought, the last Russian Grand Prix winner. But now, a hundred years later, Russia hosted another Grand Prix, which was held in Sochi this time. It was the first-class competition Formula 1. Being a partner of one of the participating teams – Marussia – we couldn’t miss the chance to see the Sochi Grand Prix with our own eyes. We wanted to know whether Willy Scholl’s successors – the fastest German racers Nico Rosberg and Sebastian Vettel – were able to be as good as their compatriot and to feel the spirit of the Olympic Village, which one more time opened its doors to fans.
The Olympic Village’s glistening splendors impressed. Only the bright sun reminded us that we came here to see not a skiing race but a motor rally. The Iceberg Stadium, where the Russian Olympic team won its first gold in a figure skating competition, was right behind the racing track.
The Olympic Village transformed into elite hotels rather looked like a summer resort than the capital of the Winter Olympics.
Our shooting crew had no time to enjoy the Olympic beauty as it was time to go to the track.
First off, we went to the paddock zone where we were met by our colleagues from the Sky Sports British channel as well as other venerable shooting crews from all over the globe. Max Chilton, the Marussia driver, and even Russian Sports Minister Vitaly Mutko were there too!
It’s noteworthy that Formula 1 is not only a sport competition, but also a truly grand Vanity Fair, or the feast of life! The highlight of the Sochi event was Lenny Kravitz’s show:
Such a massive and significant event was a near perfect venue for business meetings. We couldn’t miss this opportunity: our Strategic Development Director for Asia and Eastern Europe Roman Tsepelev met with Marussia’s UK Managing Director Andy Webb:
Also, the Formula 1 Grand Prix gave us the opportunity to award two our customers VIP tours, during which in addition to the tourist delights of Sochi, they were given VIP tickets to the first Grand Prix of Russia in modern history. They were sincerely rewarded for many years of fruitful cooperation with InstaForex. The lucky ones became Konstantin and Aleksander:
But let’s get back to the race. Max Chilton, the Marussia driver, did his best to make his opponents fight:
But, unfortunately, he was unable to finish the race. The answer to the question we raised at the beginning of the post is that neither Nico Rosberg nor quadruple world champion Sebastian Vettel managed to take the victory as their successful compatriot did. Nico Rosberg was the closest to success, but he only took the second place, having lost to race leader Lewis Hamilton from the U.K. But it wasn’t so important to us. The main thing was that Russia arranged a grand sports event, and that the Queen of motorsport returned to Russia after a century. Well, we were happy to be a small, but still a part of this big occasion!

On May 18, 1914, German racing driver Willy Scholl won the Russian Grand Prix in St. Petersburg. He became the second, and as many thought, the last Russian Grand Prix winner. But now, a hundred years later, Russia hosted another Grand Prix, which was held in Sochi this time. It was the first-class competition Formula 1. Being a partner of one of the participating teams – Marussia – we couldn’t miss the chance to see the Sochi Grand Prix with our own eyes. We wanted to know whether Willy Scholl’s successors – the fastest German racers Nico Rosberg and Sebastian Vettel – were able to be as good as their compatriot and to feel the spirit of the Olympic Village, which one more time opened its doors to fans.

Гран-при России

The Olympic Village’s glistening splendors impressed. Only the bright sun reminded us that we came here to see not a skiing race but a motor rally. The Iceberg Stadium, where the Russian Olympic team won its first gold in a figure skating competition, was right behind the racing track.

The Olympic Village transformed into elite hotels rather looked like a summer resort than the capital of the Winter Olympics.

2

Our shooting crew had no time to enjoy the Olympic beauty as it was time to go to the track.

3

First off, we went to the paddock zone where we were met by our colleagues from the Sky Sports British channel as well as other venerable shooting crews from all over the globe.

7

Max Chilton, the Marussia driver,

6

and even Russian Sports Minister Vitaly Mutko were there too!

5

It’s noteworthy that Formula 1 is not only a sport competition, but also a truly grand Vanity Fair, or the feast of life! The highlight of the Sochi event was Lenny Kravitz’s show:

8

Such a massive and significant event was a near perfect venue for business meetings. We couldn’t miss this opportunity: our Strategic Development Director for Asia and Eastern Europe Roman Tsepelev met with Marussia’s UK Managing Director Andy Webb:

9

Also, the Formula 1 Grand Prix gave us the opportunity to award two our customers VIP tours, during which in addition to the tourist delights of Sochi, they were given VIP tickets to the first Grand Prix of Russia in modern history. They were sincerely rewarded for many years of fruitful cooperation with InstaForex. The lucky ones became Konstantin and Aleksander:

10

But let’s get back to the race. Max Chilton, the Marussia driver, did his best to make his opponents fight:

11

But, unfortunately, he was unable to finish the race. The answer to the question we raised at the beginning of the post is that neither Nico Rosberg nor quadruple world champion Sebastian Vettel managed to take the victory as their successful compatriot did. Nico Rosberg was the closest to success, but he only took the second place, having lost to race leader Lewis Hamilton from the U.K. But it wasn’t so important to us.

The main thing was that Russia arranged a grand sports event, and that the Queen of motorsport returned to Russia after a century. Well, we were happy to be a small, but still a part of this big occasion!